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Primary Love Language Quiz

Primary Love Language Quiz
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Hey everyone! How do you show love to your chosen ones? What is your primary love language? Answer twenty questions and see for yourself!

Primary Love Language Quiz

Affection or fondness is a “disposition or state of mind or body” that is often associated with a feeling or type of love. It has given rise to several branches of philosophy and psychology concerning emotion, disease, influence, and state of being “Affection” is popularly used to denote a feeling or type of love, amounting to more than goodwill or friendship. Writers on ethics generally use the word to refer to distinct states of feeling, both lasting and spasmodic. Some contrast it with passion as being free from the distinctively sensual element.

Even a very simple demonstration of affection can have a broad variety of emotional reactions, from embarrassment to disgust, pleasure, and annoyance. It also has a different physical effect on the giver and the receiver.

More specifically, the word has been restricted to emotional states, the object of which is a living thing such as a human or animal. Affection is compared with passion, from the Greek “pathos”. As such it appears in the writings of French philosopher René Descartes, Dutch philosopher Baruch Spinoza, and most of the writings of early British ethicists. However, on various grounds (e.g., that it does not involve anxiety or excitement and that it is comparatively inert and compatible with the entire absence of the gratifyingly physical element), it is generally distinguished from passion. In this narrower sense, the word has played a great part in ethical systems, which have spoken of the social or parental affections as in some sense a part of moral obligations. A consideration of these and similar problems depend ultimately on the degree to which the affections are regarded as voluntary.

Affection can be communicated by looks, words, gestures, or touches. It conveys love and social connection. The five primary love languages deeply explain how couples can communicate affection to each other. Affectionate behavior may have evolved from parental nurturing behavior due to its associations with hormonal rewards. Such affection has been shown to influence brain development in infants, especially their biochemical systems and prefrontal development. Expressions of affection can be unwelcome if they pose implied threats to one’s well-being. If welcomed, affectionate behavior may be associated with various health benefits. It has been proposed that positive sentiments increase the propensity of people to interact and that familiarity gained through affection increases positive sentiments among them.

Affection exchange is seen as an adaptive human behavior that contributes to greater physical and mental well-being. The expression of affection mediates emotional, physical, and relational benefits for the individual and significant counterparts. The communication of positive feelings towards others has shown health benefits that include lower stress hormones, lower cholesterol, lower blood pressure, and a stronger immune system. Benefits are internally noticed when the emotion is expressed and not merely felt; if affection is not reciprocated through the receiver, the effects of the affection are still felt through the giver.

Love encompasses a range of strong and positive emotional and mental states, from the most sublime virtue or good habit, the deepest interpersonal affection, to the simplest pleasure. An example of this range of meanings is that the love of a mother differs from the love of a spouse, which differs from the love for food. Most commonly, love refers to a feeling of a strong attraction and emotional attachment.

The word “love” can have a variety of related but distinct meanings in different contexts. Many other languages use multiple words to express some of the different concepts that in English are denoted as “love”; one example is the plurality of Greek concepts for “love” (agape, eros, philia, storge). Cultural differences in conceptualizing love thus doubly impede the establishment of a universal definition.

Although the nature or essence of love is a subject of frequent debate, different aspects of the word can be clarified by determining what isn’t love (antonyms of “love”). Love as a general expression of positive sentiment (a stronger form of like) is commonly contrasted with hate (or neutral apathy). As a less-sexual and more-emotionally intimate form of romantic attachment, love is commonly contrasted with lust. As an interpersonal relationship with romantic overtones, love is sometimes contrasted with friendship, although the word love is often applied to close friendships or platonic love. (Further possible ambiguities come with usages “girlfriend”, “boyfriend”, “just good friends”).

Abstractly discussed, love usually refers to an experience one person feels for another. Love often involves caring for, or identifying with, a person or thing (cf. vulnerability and care theory of love), including oneself (cf. narcissism). In addition to cross-cultural differences in understanding love, ideas about love have also changed greatly over time. Some historians date modern conceptions of romantic love to courtly Europe during or after the Middle Ages, although the prior existence of romantic attachments is attested by ancient love poetry.

How do you show your love? What is important to you in a partner? What do you not accept in the behavior of the other person? Answer twenty questions and see for yourself now!

How many questions are there?

There are 20 questions.

What can you get as a result?

Touch, Time, Gifts, Words

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